Richmond Art Center Richmond Art Center

Collective Care Is Our Best Protection

Collective Care Is Our Best Protection

Favianna Rodriguez, Elaine Chu and Marina Perez-Wong (Twin Walls Mural Company), Keena Azania Romano, Leslie Dime Lopez, Vanessa Agana Espinoza Solari, and Yazmin Shi Shi Madriz

Exhibition: June 22 – August 20, 2022
Opening Reception: Saturday, June 18, 2pm-4pm
Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Location: Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

Together we are strong. And in a troubled world collective care is our best protection.

This exhibition brings together a group of women artists who are at the forefront in activating public consciousness through muralism and printmaking. At the center are works that illustrate the healing and protective power that resides in the act of collective care. 

On display are two large scale portable murals: one painted by Elaine Chu and Marina Perez-Wong from Twin Walls Mural Company titled Protectors of the Sacred, Power: A Prayer for Buffalo Nation; and the other painted by Keena Romano, Leslie Dime Lopez, Vanessa Agana Espinoza Solari and Yazmin Shi Shi Madriz titled Portals thru Powerful Prayers. Complementing these two murals are a series of collages and prints by Favianna Rodriguez that speak to our relationship with food and plants through rituals of self and collective care.  

These works were created during the pandemic and stemmed out of a dire need to share responsibility for each others’ well-being.  As we cautiously walk out of this pandemic, the artists’ work serve as a reminder of the need to continue embracing each other, especially as the pandemic made clear that issues in accessing affordable housing, health care, environmental protections, immigrant rights, and indigenous land sovereignty are deep struggles we remain in. 

The title of the exhibition borrows from Favianna Rodriguez’ series “Collective Care is Our Best Protection” created during the pandemic as a “call for communities to care for each other and develop strong and autonomous support systems of mutual aid.”

Artists

Favianna Rodriguez 

Twin Walls Mural Company: Elaine Chu and Marina Perez-Wong 

Keena Azania Romano, Leslie Dime Lopez, Vanessa Agana Espinoza Solari, Yazmin Shi Shi Madriz

Top image: Twin Walls Mural Company, Protectors of the Sacred, Power: A Prayer for Buffalo Nation, 2020

 

Women Weaving Stories – Mujeres Tejiendo Historias – Eje xuj nchachmon qa o che ex tuj

Español | Mam

Women Weaving Stories – Mujeres Tejiendo Historias

Exhibition: June 1 – August 20, 2022
Opening Reception: Saturday, June 25, 2pm-4pm
Collaborative Learning Circle: Saturday, July 30, 1:30pm-3:30pm | More info…
Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Location: Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

Women Weaving Stories is an exhibition of a newly released art zine created by members of Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA) an organization of Latina and Indigenous immigrant women with a dual mission of promoting personal transformation and building community power for social and economic justice. This project was done in partnership with NAKA Dance Theater.

As a culmination of a participatory art project, the zine was created by a cohort of Latina and Indigenous immigrant women who came together in a series of collaborative learning circles where art was used as a medium to share stories, learn from each other, and give voice to their lived experiences as immigrant women in the United States. This exhibition presents the individual pages of the zine as poster size prints. Through colorful imagery, these pages weave together the personal reflections of the women’s experiences as Latina and Indigenous people in the United States. 

This exhibition is presented in Mam, Spanish and English. Oakland and the larger Bay Area is home to the largest Mam speaking community outside of Guatemala. Many of the women who participated in this project are Indigenous immigrants from Guatemala who speak Mam and/or Spanish as their primary language. Translation to Mam was done by Ana Diaz.   

About the Artists: We are a diverse group of women who have woven our lives and our stories into these drawings, creating a tapestry of our histories. We have cultivated a creative space where we support and listen to each other through art, caring for each other, making space and working in solidarity to transform the challenges we face under a patriarchal system. Through these experiences, we recognize the profound importance of raising our voices as women united in a movement.

About the Zine: Starting in late 2020 and continuing through 2021, we began to work as a team in Collaborative Learning Circles (Círculos de Aprendizaje), meeting twice a week on Zoom. We built an inclusive space, where we learn, adapt and figure out how to communicate with each other. Since our team is made up of people who speak different languages, using illustrations in the zine seemed the most appropriate way to express what we wanted to express without needing to choose a particular language, while still recognizing each person’s languages ​​and traditions. 

The Fotonovela team is made up of Adriana Pérez, Leticia García, Luciana Rodríguez, Paulina Calmo and Victoria Pablo, in collaboration with NAKA Dance Theater and members of MUA.

Mujeres Unidas Y Activas is an organization of Latina and Indigenous immigrant women with a dual mission of promoting personal transformation and building community power for social and economic justice.

NAKA Dance Theater creates experimental performance works using dance, storytelling, multimedia installations and site-specific environments. NAKA builds partnerships with communities, engages people’s histories and folklore and expresses experiences through accessible performances that challenge the viewer to think critically about social justice issues.

Top Image: J. Ramirez Pablo, Untitled, 2021 


Español

 

Mujeres Tejiendo Historias – Women Weaving Stories 

Fecha de Expocision: 1 de junio de 2022 – 20 de agosto de 2022 
Recepción de apertura: Sábado, 25 de junio, 14:00-16:00
Círculo de Aprendizaje: Sábado 30 de julio, 1:30-3:30pm | Más información…
Horario de la galería: Miércoles-Sábado, 10am-4pm
Localización: Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA) y NAKA Danza Teatro se enorgullece en presentar la publicación de nuestra primera fotonovela, ahora convertida en una exposición.

Somos diversas mujeres que fuimos tejiendonos con nuestras historias en estos dibujos, como lo hace un telar, el cual tenemos muy presente porque forma parte de nuestra vida. Generamos un territorio creativo para acompañarnos y escucharnos a través del arte, cuidándonos unas a otras y dando un espacio para transformar los aconteceres con los que lidiamos en este sistema patriarcal en solidaridad y apoyo mutuo. Todo esto nos ha llevado a reconocer la profunda importancia de nuestra voz como mujeres unidas y activas. 

Este proyecto se realizó durante la pandemia a finales del año 2020 y todo el 2021 mediante el Zoom. Participaron mujeres miembras de MUA (una organización de mujeres Latines e Indígenas inmigrantes de base con la doble misión de promover la transformación personal y fomentar el poder comunitario).  

La revista está conformada por cuatro secciones, que se definieron a partir del interés de las participantes: En la primera, nos enfocamos en manifestar lo que representa MUA para cada una de nosotras. En la segunda, visibilizamos aspectos culturales de nuestra vida diaria, priorizando los alimentos, las costumbres, tradiciones de nuestros países; y en la autodeterminación de nuestros pueblos indígenas. En la tercera, hablamos sobre cuestiones de género. Y en la última sección sobre migración, centrándonos en aspectos relacionados a vivencias personales y emocionales que nos atraviesan como inmigrantes.

El equipo de Mujeres Tejiendo Historias está conformado por: Adriana Pérez, Leticia García, Luciana Rodríguez, Paulina Calmo y Victoria Pablo. 

Imagen: J. Ramirez Pablo, Untitled, 2021 


Mam

 

Eje xuj nchachmon qa o che ex tuj 

tajlal xjaw tun tex q’on junio 1, 2022 – Agosto 20, 2022

Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA) ex Naka Danza Teatro ntzalaj ma k-elix tyein tnejil tib’lal (fotonovela) otz’ok qq’ona te ye’k’b’il.

ojoya xuj la’ qb’aja o kub qchmona qa o q-exa tuj (historia) chu’n qa tib’lal lu’, ju’ tisin ntemb’a jun chemaj (telar) tun jun aj chmol , jatzin jlu tkub’saxix qwitza  ex otz’ok te tajlal qchwinqlala. O b’ant t-ten jun tenb’il chb’anix quna ja tum tun chtena quk’la ex tun tzaj chb’ina qoya tun jun tb’anixix yek’b’il (arte), nqo kuena qeya qunx qib’xa, ex nxi q-q’ona jun amb’il tun tch’expaj jaj jun o-qexa tuj ex nqo q’ona ipb’il tij jun sistema patriarcal ex nqo oni qeye qwitz qib’a. Chaqil jlu o tzaj t-yek’iin qeye jaj txilen jun qwiya xuj qoya Mujeres unida y activas.

Jaj jun aq’untl lu ja tb’ant tuj jun yab’il (pandemia) ch’ixtaq tel ab’q’i 2020 ex  chaqiltzin ab’q’i te 2021 tuj jun programa te zoom. o che aq’nan txjali MUA (Jun chmob’il che xuj te junl tnam (latinas) ex qe q-xechil te aj tu qyol (indigena) o q-u’l tuj junl tnam (imigrantes) ja te toklen tun txi tman ex tun tb’ant chten qe xjal ex tun txi cham tun t-ten tipin tnam.

Jaj jun yek’b’il u’j lu te chaj piẍ te’l, o b’aj b’inchan alche il tij te che qa aj ajb’el: Tuj tnejil piẍ, o tz’ok q-q’ona tilil tun txi q-yek’na al che te MUA txilen te junwin qeye. Tuj tkab’in piẍ, o txi qyek’na al che txilen qeya q-xechil tuj qchwinqlala, lujtzin qe wab’j nb’ant qu’na te jatuma tzajin qoya chuj qe tnam ex jun tb’anixix txilen te qeya te aj tu qyol qoya, lujtzin qe qniq’ije tuj qe tnam; ex ojoxa nqo ximna tun tb’ant qtanma che qxjala (indigena). Te t-toxin piẍ,  o qo yolna tij xjalilal (genero). Tuj tzin tch’ip piẍ o qo yolna tij n-chi’ xjal tuj chtanmi (migración) o ok q-q’o na il tij ex o txi qb’ina alchekyaq te junwin o tz’ex tuj jaj nb’aj qija te junl tnam qoya.

A jun k’loj xuj aj chmol alkyechaq o ch-ex tuj b’inchamaj chun qe ajb’inchal: Adriana Pérez, Leticia García, Luciana Rodríguez, Paulina Calmo y Victoria Pablo. 

 

The Eastern Shore: Works by J.B. Broussard

The Eastern Shore

Works by J.B. Broussard

Exhibition: June 8 – July 23, 2022
Opening Reception: Saturday, June 18, 2pm-4pm
Artist Talk: Saturday, July 9, 12pm-1pm | More info…
Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Location: Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

In his solo exhibition, The Eastern Shore, artist J.B. Broussard presents a selection of work that honors the legacy and expressions of freedom of the great 19th century abolitionists Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass.

At the center are Broussard’s new bronze sculptures of Tubman and Douglass, reverentially casting the bravery, wisdom, and resilience that both embodied in their fight against slavery and in their pursuit for human and civil rights. Complementing the sculptures are Broussard’s early work, charcoal drawings and paintings created in his youth that capture in portraiture, expressions of the Black experience.

Together, this collection of work traces the artistic path of artist J.B Broussard, and in the process brings about the underlying spirit that animates his work: to capture with dignity the expression of human beings in their struggle for freedom.

The show’s title, The Eastern Shore, pays tribute to the region where Tubman and Douglass were born and escaped slavery from, and where their fight for freedom and dignity began.

About the Artist: J.B. Broussard is a second generation native of Oakland. He began drawing at age of seven, took art classes during secondary school, and years later attended U.C. Berkeley as an Art major where he focused primarily on sculpture. After graduating from U.C. Berkeley he settled into a career in education. Now retired Broussard spends his time engaged in art projects. As a teenager he was exposed to the work of Charles White. Broussard describes the experience of viewing White’s work as “an awakening.” White’s dignified images of Black people had a lasting impact on him.

This exhibition is part of the Art of the African Diaspora: Luminaries series, and is generously funded by the East Bay Fund for Artists at the East Bay Community Foundation.

Art of the African Diaspora: Luminaries
Luminaries is a series of four solo exhibitions that shine a spotlight on the remarkable work of four artists – Diamela Cutiño, J.B. Broussard, Donna Gatson and Daniel W. White – who have participated in Art of the African Diaspora but who have maintained an inconspicuous public image throughout their storied artistic careers. The four exhibitions will be presented in the West Gallery throughout 2022, as part of the 25th anniversary of Art of the African Diaspora.

Top Image: J.B. Broussard, The General, 2021. Courtesy of the Artist

Emmy Lou Packard: Artist of Conscience

 
Emmy Lou Packard: Artist of Conscience
Exhibition: June 22 – August 20, 2022
 
Public Programs
Opening Reception: Saturday, June 18, 2pm-4pm
How Emmy Lou Packard Made Her Prints (demonstration): Saturday, July 16, 12pm-2pm
Rebel Art: Emmy Lou Packard’s Legacy (panel discussion): Friday, July 29, 6pm-7:30pm
Film screening of Rivera In America: Thursday, August 11, 6:30pm-8:30pm
Closing Reception with The Great Tortilla Conspiracy: Saturday, August 20, 12pm-2pm
 
All events are free and open to the public. No RSVP needed.
 
Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Location: Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804
 
 
Artist of Conscience explores the life and work of Emmy Lou Packard (1914-1998), a remarkable artist known for her paintings, prints and murals, as well as her activism. Packard’s linoleum prints celebrated ordinary people — their work, their history and their environment. Her art was not overtly political, but expressed her progressive values. One of her signature images, Peace is a Human Right, shows three children, Asian, Black and White, seated around a sunflower. The message is framed in human terms — children are not political; they are just children.
 
Through artworks, photos and ephemera, the exhibition at Richmond Art Center will be organized around key periods of Packard’s life. Packard was mentored by Diego Rivera and became his principal assistant on the mural he painted on Treasure Island for the Golden Gate International Exposition in 1940 (currently on view at SFMOMA). During WWII Packard worked at Kaiser shipyard’s newspaper, Fore ‘n’ Aft, in Richmond. Later in life, Packard mentored a generation of mostly female and Chicana artists in the Bay Area. She also led the movement to save the Mendocino headlands from development.
 
This exhibition is curated by Robbin Légère Henderson and Rick Tejada-Flores.
 
Emmy Lou Packard: Artist of Conscience was made possible with support from The Jay DeFeo Foundation. Vital support was also provided by California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
 
          
 
Top image: Emmy Lou Packard, Artichoke Picker, circa 1955, 17″ x 22″
 
 
 

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