Richmond Art Center Richmond Art Center

East Bay Times: Richmond, Alameda art exhibits celebrate Black History Month

‘Art of the African Diaspora,’ ‘Demystifying the Journey’ feature Bay Area artists’ works

By MARTA YAMAMOTO | Correspondent

PUBLISHED: February 6, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. | UPDATED: February 7, 2021 at 7:14 a.m.

In honor of Black History Month, the Richmond Art Center is hosting its “Art of the African Diaspora” exhibit along with a satellite exhibit at Alameda’s Rhythmix Cultural Works. The exhibits offer opportunities to view art inspired and produced by Bay Area artists of African descent as it reflects the spirit and creativity of African people and, through artists’ talks and virtual open studios, opportunities to hear their stories and appreciate their creativity.

Clay at home? Yes! | With Love… Issue 14

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ISSUE 14 – Clay at Home  |   Get Ready for Art of the African Diaspora   |   Welcome Sarah!   |   Classes Starting Soon


Clay at Home

Free online workshop THIS Sunday

Sunday, February 7, 10am-11:15am

Learn how easy it is to set up your own ceramics space! Marisa Burman, Richmond Art Center’s ceramics studio manager, will discuss and demonstrate how best to set-up a space for working with clay in your home.

More info…


Get Ready for Art of the African Diaspora

Featuring Over 120 Artists of African Descent!

Online Exhibition: February 11 – May 16, 2021

Art of the African Diaspora starts next week! Now in its 25th year, but presented as an online exhibition for the first time, Art of the African Diaspora will showcase artwork by over 120 Black artists from the Bay Area. The event also offers numerous artist-organized happenings that everyone is invited to join. Meet artists, learn about and from their work, and celebrate this creative community.

Where to stay updated on what’s happening:
Online Exhibition at Richmond Art Center (goes live February 11)
Art of the African Diaspora (event website)
AOTAD Facebook Page
@aotadofficial (Instagram)

More info…


Welcome Sarah!

Introducing our CAC Administrator of Color Fellow

We’re thrilled to announce Richmond Art Center has been selected as a host organization for the inaugural California Arts Council’s Administrators of Color Fellowship. Our amazing fellow is production manager and non-profit administrator Sarah Guerra. She will participate in a nine-month professional development fellowship at Richmond Art Center committed to expanding equity in the arts.

“I’m honored to be part of the inaugural class of CAC fellows,” says Sarah. “It is such an imperative and unique moment in history; our class of arts administrators of color are needed now more than ever.”

More info…


Classes Starting Soon

Digital Art: Mixed Media Mash Ups

Get weird and have fun with digital mashups! This digital collage class focuses on free to access and easy to use software.

All Ages Class
Saturdays, 12-2pm
Feb 6 – Feb 27
More info…


Things That Go!

Students will use mixed media to create things that go, such a water bottle airplane and texture train. Great for kids in love with all things transportation.

Kids Class (Ages 5-11)
Wednesdays, 3-4pm
Feb 10 – Feb 24

More info…


Creative Exploration Series: Intuitive Drawing

This class series is about creative expansion and artistic self-discovery. In Intuitive Drawing students will experiment with drawing techniques that encourage them to create in new and surprising ways.

All Ages Class
Saturdays, 11am-12pm
Feb 13 – Feb 20

More info…


Resistance is Beautiful

Learn ways to use resist methods in ceramics to create decorative surfaces. By using resist, you can “resist” glaze or underglaze being in particular areas of your piece and add interest and design perspectives to your ceramic creations.

Adult Workshop
Saturday, 10am-12pm
Feb 20

More info…


Have something to share? Please email us at admin@nullrichmondartcenter.org

Press Release: Art of the African Diaspora at Macy’s Union Square

Macy’s Union Square in San Francisco presents a satellite exhibition for Art of the African Diaspora in honor of Black History Month 

Featured artists: Derrick Bell, Stephen Bruce, Orin Carpenter, Tiffany Conway, Kelvin Curry, Andrea McCoy Harvey, and Akili Simba

Exhibition Dates: February 13 – 28, 2021
Meet the Artists: February 13 & 14, 20 & 21, 27 & 28, 1pm-5pm
Location: Macy’s Union Square, 170 O’Farrell Street, San Francisco

Richmond, CA: Art of the African Diaspora is thrilled to partner with Macy’s Union Square to present a satellite exhibition as part of their 2021 program. Seven participating artists will exhibit their work throughout Macy’s San Francisco store at 170 O’Farrell Street from February 13 through to February 28. These artists are Derrick Bell, Stephen Bruce, Orin Carpenter, Tiffany Conway, Kelvin Curry, Andrea McCoy Harvey, and Akili Simba.

Special artist events are happening on February 13 & 14, 20 & 21, 27 & 28 from 1pm to 5pm. During these times visitors to Macy’s will have the opportunity to meet exhibiting artists, and learn about and from their work, in an open studio environment.

For twenty-five years Art of the African Diaspora, in partnership with Richmond Art Center, has supported artists of African descent in the Bay Area through representation, professional development, and building a creative community. In 2021 Art of the African Diaspora will be a hybrid online/in-person event presented at aotad.org, richmondartcenter.org, and at venues throughout the Bay Area. Over 120 artists will be featured in an online exhibition highlighting their work, bios and artist statements at richmondartcenter.org. The online exhibition will run February 11 through to May 16, 2021. For more information about the special online artist Reception and Guest Speaker Evening, as well as numerous artist-organized events, visit https://richmondartcenter.org/exhibitions/aotad2021/

About Art of the African Diaspora: Art of the African Diaspora is the longest running event of its kind in the Bay Area. It originated from a salon for African American artists known as Colors of Black that was organized in 1990 by artist and professor Marie Johnson Calloway. In 1997 artists Jan Hart-Schuyers and Rae Louise Hayward founded The Art of Living Black at Richmond Art Center, and many of the artists from Colors of Black participated in the inaugural exhibition. Hart-Schuyers and Hayward developed The Art of Living Black to present the work of emerging and established African American artists, introduce them to new audiences, and build a creative community of artists and art lovers. Over the next twenty-five years Richmond Art Center’s commitment in presenting the exhibition ensured the increased visibility for African American artists in the Bay Area that Hart-Schuyers and Hayward wanted. Tragically Hart-Schuyers passed away in 1998 and Hayward died in 2008. However, their organizing efforts were carried on for many years by their husbands Henri Schuyers and Steven Hopkins, and Steven’s sister Melba Lazenby, who passed away in 2013. Since 2018, the event has been produced by a Steering Committee of artists dedicated to the vision of Hart-Schuyers and Hayward. In 2020 the event changed its name to Art of the African Diaspora to reflect a new era moving forward. aotad.org

About Richmond Art Center: Richmond Art Center has been sharing art and creating with community since 1936. Our programs encompass classes, exhibitions and events at our facility, as well as off-site activities that bring free, high-quality art making experiences to WCCUSD schools, community centers, and Richmond Public Library. Richmondartcenter.org

About Macy’s: Macy’s is America’s Department Store. For more than 160 years, Macy’s, the largest retail brand of Macy’s, Inc., has served generations at every stage of their lives. Macy’s customers come to us for fashion, value and high-quality products. We are proud of our heritage and the unique role we play in American culture and tradition. We celebrate occasions big and small, and have created decades of memorable experiences through Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks® and Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade®, as well as spectacular fashion shows, culinary events, flower shows, and celebrity appearances. With the collective support of our customers and colleagues, Macy’s helps make a difference in every market we serve, supporting local and national charities through funding and volunteer service. With fashion, value and celebration as our guide, Macy’s makes life shine brighter for our customers, colleagues, and communities.For Macy’s media materials, including images and contacts, please visit our online pressroom at macysinc.com/news-media.

Top image: Artwork by Derrick Bell

Above images: Artwork by Kelvin Curry (top), Orin Carpenter (left), and Andrea McCoy Harvey (right)

For more information contact:

Stephen Bruce, Steering Committee Chair, Art of the African Diaspora

stephenbstudios@nullyahoo.com, 916-446-3271

Amy Spencer, Exhibitions Director, Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

amy@nullrichmondartcenter.org

# # #

Welcome Sarah! Our CAC ACF Fellow

We are so excited to announce that Richmond Art Center has been selected as one of ten host organizations for the inaugural California Arts Council’s Administrators of Color Fellowship. This fellowship is administered by the School of Arts and Culture at the Mexican Heritage Plaza.

Richmond Art Center’s fellow is production manager and non-profit administrator Sarah Guerra. She will participate in a nine-month professional development fellowship at Richmond Art Center committed to expanding equity in the arts.

“I’m honored to be part of the inaugural class of CAC fellows,” says Sarah. “It is such an imperative and unique moment in history; our class of arts administrators of color are needed now more than ever.”

Staff at Richmond Art Center look forward to learning from and working with Sarah!

About Sarah Guerra

Sarah Guerra is a queer native Tejana who has dedicated her life to supporting and leveraging the arts as a tool for education and political and social justice. A Bay Area resident since 2001, Sarah is a seasoned program manager that has overseen the creation, implementation, and evolution of commissioning programs and artist residencies focused on uplifting Black and Brown queer and trans people for Brava! For Women in the Arts, Queer Cultural Center, and La Peña Cultural Center. She participated in the Ford Foundation’s inaugural Future Aesthetic cohort and has served as a liaison and conference organizer for the National Performance Network. As the Production Manager for the Queer Cultural Center, Sarah has supported the presentation of eight National Queer Arts Festivals, providing direct support and feedback to artists as well as implementing Festival logistics. She has served as a grant reviewer for San Francisco Arts Commission, Galería de la Raza, and Live Arts Boston; and recently completed the Executive Program in Arts & Culture Strategy with National Arts Strategies in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice.

About the California Arts Council Administrators of Color Fellowship

The California Arts Council Administrators of Color Fellowship program was initiated by the California Arts Council with the goal of uplifting an inclusive workforce and supporting the vibrancy of organizations that create and preserve the cultural identities of all California communities, reflecting the Arts Council’s commitment to racial equity. The pilot program is made possible by a grant from The James Irvine Foundation and 2018 one-time increased state arts funding. arts.ca.gov/programs/administrators-of-color-fellows

Atiba Sylvia Thomas

Atiba Sylvia Thomas

About: My artwork resonates a process of gathering, reflecting, composing, juxtaposing and reassemble. My color palette comes from mélange of re-claimed organic items, things others have thrown away: metal scraps, industrial leavings, abandoned commonplace objects, castoff baubles,
junked trinkets, and other discarded odds and ends. My new discovery medium is acrylic pour over found objects.

– Atiba Sylvia Thomas, Assemblage Artist and Teaching Artist

Press Release: Art of the African Diaspora

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 3, 2021

Art of the African Diaspora 2021

Featuring Over 110 Artists of African Descent

Online Exhibition: February 11 – May 16, 2021
Online Reception: Saturday, March 20, 3pm

Richmond, CAArt of the African Diaspora, in partnership with Richmond Art Center, supports artists of African descent in the Bay Area through representation, professional development, and building a creative community.

In 2021 Art of the African Diaspora will be a hybrid online/in-person event presented at aotad.orgrichmondartcenter.org, and at venues throughout the Bay Area.* Over 110 artists will be featured in an online exhibition highlighting their work, bios and artist statements. The online exhibition will run February 11 through to May 16, 2021. richmondartcenter.org/exhibitions/aotad2021

“Art of the African Diaspora is an exhibition that introduces African Diaspora art to new audiences, but also provides fresh insight into its artists and their Bay Area experiences. We are excited that the 2021 program will be a virtual hybrid which we anticipate will expand our audience,” says Stephen Bruce, artist and Steering Committee Chair that produces Art of the African Diaspora.

In conjunction with the online exhibition, artists will host open studios, artists talks and satellite exhibitions throughout February, March, April and May 2021. These artist-curated events will be both virtual and in-person happenings (covid-permitting), and audiences can find out about them via aotad.org. Satellite exhibition partners include Macy’s, San Francisco; Rhythmix Cultural Works, Alameda; Creative Framing & Gallery, Oakland; and NIAD, Richmond. An special online artist Reception and Guest Speaker Evening are also planned. More information about these events to be released soon.

No in person events will be held at Richmond Art Center. Individual artist events are subject to City and County health orders and compliance with the social distancing requirements.

Participating Artists: a. d. floyd, Abi Mustapha, Ajuan Mance, Akeem Raheem, Akili Simba, Alix J Magloire, Andrea McCoy Harvey, Antt’Smalls aka AnttonioDesigns, Arthur Norcome, Ashara Ekundayo, Beautiful Beads by Lan, bertrell smith, Bill A. Dallas, Brianna Mills, Carla Golder, Carrie Lee McClish, Charles Curtis Blackwell, Chasya Thierry, Christian Vassell, Chuck Harlins, Claude Lockhart Clark, Damon Powell – Artist & Theologian, Darryl Thompson, De’Ana Brownfield, Deatra Colbert, Derrick Bell, Diamela, Doitshā Jones, Dolores R Gray, Donna Gatson, Donna Meke’da Bradley, Dre’An Cox, Dulama, Elishes Cavness, Elmarise Owens, Escape Artist, Ester M. Armstrong, Fan Lee Warren, Floyd Brown, Freddie Crome Lambright, III, Gene Dominique, Genesse McGaugh, Gregory Worsham, Hilda Robinson, iam4muze, Idris Hassan, Irene Bee Kain, J of Coeurs De Papier, J. B. Broussard, JaeMe Bereal, James Gayles, James Knox, Janay Futch, Janet Barnes, Jasmine, Jason Byrd, Jason Powell-Smith, Jennifer Inez Ward, Jessica Keener, Jimi Evins, Jonathan Taylor, Joseph Robinson, Julee Richardson, Julie Atkinson, KaliMa Amilak, Karen Smith, karin turner – karinsArt, Keisha White, Kelvin Curry, Kimberley Champion, Kimberly Johnson, L Holley, Latisha Baker, Lorraine Bonner, Maalak, Marguerite, Mark Sublett, Marva Reed, Mia Mya Dawson, Michelle Tompkins, Naomi Floyd, Olubori Babaoye, Ora Clay, Orin Carpenter, Orlonda Uffre, Pam Jackson, Patricia Patterson, Patricia Perry, Raven Harper, Raymond L. Haywood, Renata, Rodney Bell, Ron Calime, Shanju, Shantae Robinson, Shante’ Young, Shawna Kinard, Stephanie Thames, Stephen Bruce, Suzane Beaubrun, Sylvia Thomas, TaSin Sabir, The Art of Justice, TheArthur Wright, Tiffany Conway, Tomye, Val Kai, Valerie Brown-Troutt, Vaughn F. Filmore, VirgiNia Jourdan Fine Art, Wanda Sabir, Xan Blood Walker, Yasmin Sayyed, Yolanda Holley, Yolanda Patton ThaSun, Zoë Boston, and Zwanda

About Art of the African DiasporaArt of the African Diaspora is the longest running event of its kind in the Bay Area. It originated from a salon for African American artists known as Colors of Black that was organized in 1990 by artist and professor Marie Johnson Calloway. In 1997 artists Jan Hart-Schuyers and Rae Louise Hayward founded The Art of Living Black at Richmond Art Center, and many of the artists from Colors of Black participated in the inaugural exhibition. Hart-Schuyers and Hayward developed The Art of Living Black to present the work of emerging and established African American artists, introduce them to new audiences, and build a creative community of artists and art lovers. Over the next twenty-five years Richmond Art Center’s commitment in presenting the exhibition ensured the increased visibility for African American artists in the Bay Area that Hart-Schuyers and Hayward wanted. Tragically Hart-Schuyers passed away in 1998 and Hayward died in 2008. However, their organizing efforts were carried on for many years by their husbands Henri Schuyers and Steven Hopkins, and Steven’s sister Melba Lazenby, who passed away in 2013. Since 2018, the event has been produced by a Steering Committee of artists dedicated to the vision of Hart-Schuyers and Hayward. In 2020 the event changed its name to Art of the African Diaspora to reflect a new era moving forward. aotad.org

About Richmond Art Center: Richmond Art Center has been sharing art and creating with community since 1936. Our programs encompass classes, exhibitions and events at our facility, as well as off-site activities that bring free, high-quality art making experiences to WCCUSD schools, community centers, and Richmond Public Library. richmondartcenter.org


Images: Artworks by Fan Lee Warren (top), Val kai (above left), and Tiffany Conway (above right)

For more information contact:
Stephen Bruce, Steering Committee Chair, Art of the African Diaspora
stephenbstudios@nullyahoo.com, 916-446-3271

Amy Spencer, Exhibitions Director, Richmond Art Center
amy@nullrichmondartcenter.org
 

# # #

Ora Clay

Ora Clay

About: In Alabama, as a young child, I observed my mother making quilts for our beds on a quilting frame made with two-by- fours. I watched her stretch the balls of cotton that we grew on the farm into a batting layer, and wash and soften flour sacks for backing fabric. The pieced top of the quilt was recycled from clothes we had outgrown.

Some years ago my daughter took me to a series of classes at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco (MOAD), which was taught by master quilter, Marion Coleman. This allowed me to continue the quilting tradition. Since those first quilts, I have done dozens of quilting projects. My quilts have been exhibited over two dozen times, with one being featured in the New York Times Art Section along with other quilts from the African American Quilting Guild of Oakland (AAQGO).

I am reminded of the utility of quilts when I think of my mother. But quilts are also beautiful art, and a great vehicles for storytelling. I enjoy the process of quilt making. We have moved from coverings for beds to public and private art depicting who we are.

Quilting not only allows me to create beautiful art, working with different colors and textures, but also to use the beauty of the quilting medium to draw the viewer into thinking about serious issues facing our world.

Website: www.quiltsbyora.com

More info: Please contact me through my web page.

Valerie Brown-Troutt

Valerie Brown-Troutt

VALERIE BROWN-TROUTT
Something wonderful happened to me during the summer of 1999. I claimed and discovered my artist: Me! I went to several second hand shops and bought old canvas and found thrown away framed pictures and took them apart, covered them with gesso and started a studio on my patio.
I got lost for hours in the dialogue of mixing color, creation, making meaning through images and mediation. Turning old ugly things into something new is so much fun and inexpensive. Messing up, changing my mind and starting all over again satisfied by creative energy
Art in a variety of forms has always been my passion. I love paintings, poems, theater, jazz, singers, poetry, actors and actresses, photography, great movie pictures, sculpture, rhetoric, comedy, nature, etc.
My art, often whimsically, intentionally creates what I have missed in my art loving experience, me! For example, I was born into a world that never showed me a lovely black, fat angel, so I painted me some. I am nurtured by and long to see things that look like me, especially my people (whom I love) and my ancestors. This is where it started.

I continue today to address the absence of images that I think are important to the stories of my life and culture. I create to preserve and share with others especially my grandchildren what life is for me presently and while growing up in the 50’s and 60’s. Many of these images celebrate the core values of my spirituality and codes of the communities of my origins which makes life meaningful for me.

Website: valeriebrowntroutt.com

Patricia Perry

Patricia Perry

About: Painting has always held a special place in my heart. Art reflects, radiates and reveals God’s omnipresence here on earth. It can stimulate the wonderment of ones mind to not only see its visual beauty, but to feel the essence of the wind. I live to paint another day!

Bill A. Dallas

Bill A. Dallas

About: From early childhood until now Bill A. Dallas has been connected with music and painting – especially the beauty of jazz, and how it reflects his style of painting, which he calls artmatism.

The significance of all music plays an important part in his art world, which goes far beyond just images and colors. He finds that music has a crucial role in how he approaches artmatism painting.

He’s created a unique harmony of rhythm that is entirely original, rhythmic, and with a full orchestration of movement and color.
Painting is truly one of the perfect instruments to illustrate the real depth and complexities of the central absorbing moments of life’s mystery.
The term “artmatism” can imply a metaphor for music, particularly jazz music – being fascinated by painting’s emotional power, each painting expresses itself through color, shape and space. It allows the viewer to engage with a freedom of imagination, interpretations and emotional responses.

His strokes come from a vivid and complex world of emotions and memories from his past. Dallas brings to life in his art the true colors, sounds and beauty of the music in his unheard of, but seen in his paintings.
He’s making a physical and powerful connection between color and sound.
If one can open that delicate mind we all procreate at times, one can feel the resemblance transported on canvas, the multiple colors of exhilarating sounds of great music!

As a young ambitious artist and very curious about learning he decided to pursue an art degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in the department of Art Practice.

It was a privilege to be embraced by such great art professors as Loran, Hartmann, Voulkos, Melchert, Bischoff, Kasten and Robert Hudson.

Website: billadallasartmatism.wordpress.com/what-is-artmatism/

Visit and Contact

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Avenue
Richmond, CA 94804