Richmond Art Center Richmond Art Center

To our valued Richmond Art Center community

To our valued Richmond Art Center community:

We add our voice and join with so many others who understand and value the crucial impact the arts and humanities bring to us as individuals, as members of our communities, and to our society, nationally and globally.

The proposed federal budget estimates $54 billion in domestic program cuts, which will eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the funding for afterschool programs throughout the country. These critical funds support local artists, writers, poets, historians, and nonprofit arts organizations, such as the Richmond Art Center’s Art in the Community program, making the arts accessible to underserved Richmond children and teens.

The Richmond Art Center stands with our nonprofit and cultural partners, and with citizens across our country, to support those agencies and organizations that may be impacted by this proposed budget. Our own roots at the Art Center trace back to 1936 when, with the support of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), local artist Hazel Salmi traveled the streets of Richmond with a suitcase packed with art supplies, eager to teach art to anyone interested. The value the role of the arts and humanities play in our lives, and the benefit to our larger society, cannot be discounted.

We realize that the House of Representatives and the Senate are now tasked with refining, reviewing, and approving the federal budget—a process that will span the next few months.

We will be urging our representatives in Congress to continue funding these agencies and hope that you, our dedicated and vibrant community of artists and arts enthusiasts, will lend your voices in speaking to your legislators about the vital influence, critical discourse, and positive societal impact that the arts bring to all of our lives.

Very best regards,

 

 

 

 

Ric Ambrose
Executive Director, Richmond Art Center

Behind the Scenes of Marking Space

Behind the scenes when installing a new show can be adventurous work! Here are a couple of peeks from our new exhibition, Marking Space, which opens next Tuesday, March 21, at 10:00 am. But you can see everything this coming Saturday at our Opening Reception for Spring Exhibitions from 5:00 to 7:00pm.

This unique survey of sculpture and installation features the work of Mari Andrews, Robert Brady, Genevieve Hastings, Jann Nunn, Gay Outlaw, Lucy Puls, and Tracey Snelling.

Thanks to Director of Exhibitions Jan Wurm for the photos.

52nd Annual West Contra Costa Unified School District and Richmond Art Center Art in the Community Student Shows This Spring

52nd Annual West Contra Costa Unified School District and Richmond Art Center Art in the Community Student Shows This Spring

Popular shows featuring the artwork of hundreds of local students return to the Art Center’s Community Gallery this season.

RICHMOND, CA — March 9, 2017 — This Spring, the Richmond Art Center will present two exhibitions showcasing the work of West Contra Costa Unified School District’s elementary, middle and high school students. The 52nd Annual West Contra Costa Unified School District (WCCUSD) Student Art Show opens in the Community Gallery on Tuesday, March 20, followed by the Richmond Art Center’s Art in the Community Show on April 29, 2017.

Joelle Park, 10th grade, El Cerrito High School

The Richmond Art Center has a five decade-long partnership with the WCCUSD, and many of the district’s art students receive instruction from teachers who have received art-specific training through the Art Center. This exhibition features over 250  works of art, created in a variety of media—from ceramics to acrylic— representing the creative artistic talents of students from middle and high schools  throughout the school district. Says Executive Director Ric Ambrose, “The Richmond Art Center and WCCUSD share an ongoing vision: that art education is a crucial component of a thriving and productive community. We are proud to support the efforts of so many teachers and students in our district as they discover and learn through explorations in art.”

There will be a special reception honoring the WCCUSD students and art teachers on Thursday, April 13 from 5-7 pm, which will be free and open to the public. The John F. Kennedy Band will perform and several art awards will be given out for the students’ artistic talent and originality. The West Contra Costa Unified School District has generously sponsored the annual student exhibition.

Opening on April 29, the Richmond Art Center’s Art in the Community Show will feature the work of the area’s youngest artists: children from elementary and  middle schools who participated in the Art Center’s popular Art in the Community program throughout the year. The reception for the Art in the Community will take place on May 21, 2017 at noon.

These student shows coincide with the Art Center’s featured exhibitions: Marking Space, a survey of modern sculpture and installation art, and Mapping the Uncharted, an updated appreciation of mapmaking. All events and exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information about Spring exhibitions, programming, and events, please visit the Richmond Art Center’s website: http://richmondartcenter.org

About the Richmond Art Center:

The Richmond Art Center is the largest visual arts center in the East Bay, delivering exciting arts experiences to young and old alike who reflect the diverse richness of our community. The Art Center features hands-on learning, well-equipped studios, Art in the Community programs and contemporary exhibitions in its galleries.

Every year, the Richmond Art Center serves thousands of students through classes and programs taught by professional artists, both onsite at the Art Center and at sites throughout Richmond. The Art Center’s four galleries mount rotating exhibitions that display the works of emerging and established Bay Area artists. Artists such as Richard Diebenkorn, Richard Misrach, Wanxin Zhang, Mildred Howard, Bella Feldman, Hung Liu, William Wiley, June Schwartz, and David Park have been showcased here.

The Richmond Art Center originated in 1936, when local artist Hazel Salmi, who worked for the WPA, traversed the streets of Richmond with a suitcase packed with art supplies, eager to teach art to anyone interested. Today, everything at the Art Center continues to breathe life into Salmi’s original vision: That within every person lives an artist.

Visit the Richmond Art Center’s website for more information: http://richmondartcenter.org/

Contact:

Julie Sparenberg
Communications Manager
julie@nullrichmondartcenter.org
510-620-6772

The Boundaries of Sculpture and the Alternate Meanings of Maps at the Richmond Art Center

The Boundaries of Sculpture and the Alternate Meanings of Maps at the Richmond Art Center
Two new exhibitions, Marking Space and Mapping the Uncharted, bring new meaning to the traditional arts of sculpture and mapping this Spring.

 

RICHMOND, CA — February 22, 2017 — In the new Spring sculpture exhibition Marking Space, opening on March 21, seven artists examine the nature of material and expose structure in a myriad of forms. Bay Area artists Mari Andrews, Robert Brady, Genevieve Hastings, Jann Nunn, Gay Outlaw, Lucy Puls, and Tracey Snelling use diverse materials to mirror habitat and architecture, to reflect on social structures, and to represent various human concerns.

In Marking Space, the very boundaries of what sculpture has become are redefined. Turning our attention to identity, the environment, systems of power, and inequality, these artists have followed different paths with a common passion of expression. These works investigate language, the body, and the nature of image, recognition, space and orientation. Throughout these artworks, a narrative emerges: self, home, loss, boundaries.

The companion exhibition, Mapping the Uncharted, uses physical maps as a point of departure for reconfiguring impressions of geography, politics, and visual language. Historically, maps have been drawn to mark where we are, what lies around us, what lies before us, and to note the paths taken so that others may follow or we may return.

The five artists in Mapping the Uncharted give new meaning to the art of map making. Mark Garrett cuts and paints and transforms maps into visualizations of patterns that emphasize the fragility and debasement of the ecology. Lordy Rodriguez expands and conflates maps to make visible our cultural and political conceits. Diane Rosenblum appropriates artworks and superimposes auction prices creating a map of the art world. Guillermo Galindo creates scores of music composed with instruments made of found objects, these collected along the US – Mexico border in collaboration with photographer, Richard Misrach. Indira Martina Morre creates delicate surfaces marking the most ethereal — cyberspace – passwords and passages are noted with symbols and layers noting information.

The exhibitions Marking Space and Mapping the Uncharted open in the Main, West and South Galleries on March 21 and run through May, 20, 2017, at the Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA. The opening reception for both shows will take place on Saturday, March 18 from 5 – 7 pm.

Two Artists’ Panels will be presented in conjunction with these exhibitions: April 1 and April 8, both starting at 2 pm. All events and exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information about Spring exhibitions, programming, and events, please visit the Richmond Art Center’s website: http://richmondartcenter.org

Images:

Robert Brady, Return

About the Richmond Art Center:

The Richmond Art Center is the largest visual arts center in the East Bay, delivering exciting arts experiences to young and old alike who reflect the diverse richness of our community. The Art Center features hands-on learning, well-equipped studios, Art in the Community programs and contemporary exhibitions in its galleries.

Every year, the Richmond Art Center serves thousands of students through classes and programs taught by professional artists, both onsite at the Art Center and at sites throughout Richmond. The Art Center’s four galleries mount rotating exhibitions that display the works of emerging and established Bay Area artists. Artists such as Richard Diebenkorn, Richard Misrach, Wanxin Zhang, Mildred Howard, Bella Feldman, Hung Liu, William Wiley, June Schwartz, and David Park have been showcased here.

The Richmond Art Center originated in 1936, when local artist Hazel Salmi, who worked for the WPA, traversed the streets of Richmond with a suitcase packed with art supplies, eager to teach art to anyone interested. Today, everything at the Art Center continues to breathe life into Salmi’s original vision: That within every person lives an artist.

Visit the Richmond Art Center’s website for more information: http://richmondartcenter.org/

Contact:

Julie Sparenberg
Communications Manager
julie@nullrichmondartcenter.org
510-620-6772

 

Free Family Events Keep All Ages Making Art

Family Art Fridays at E. M. Downer YMCA

We’ve added Family Art Fridays to keep all ages making art together. These free classes take place at the E. M. Downer YMCA, located at 263 South 20th Street in Richmond, from 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Bring the whole family! Snacks provided! No registration required.

March 31,6:00 – 8:00 pm: Jump Into Printmaking with Dawline Oni-Eseleh

April 28, 6:00 – 8:00 pm: Painting and More with Lauren Ari

May 26, 6:00 – 8:00 pm: Stencil Screen Printing with Rachel Schaffran

See you at the YMCA!

 

 

 

 

See & Make Art

Our popular Saturday afternoon series continues full steam ahead! Join us on the last Saturday afternoon of each month! Meet us at the Library for a story, make some art, then head over to the galleries to enjoy our latest exhibition. Open to all ages. Families welcome. Please meet the group in the Madeline F. Whittlesey Community Room at the Richmond Public Library, Main Branch (325 Civic Center Plaza) and we’ll walk as a group over to the Art Center.

March 25, 1:00 – 3:00 pm: Mask Making with Grace Rosario Perkins

April 29, 1:00 – 3:00 pm: Exploring Your Dreams with Vreni Michelini Castillo

May 27, 1:00 – 3:00 pm: Making Paper Dragons

June 24, 1:00 – 3:00 pm: Journal Making with Rebekah Erev

July 29, 1:00 – 3:00 pm: Stamping Patterns with Dawline Oni-Eseleh

To see all of our free events, visit our Events Calendar.

March Workshops: Engage Your Creative Process in One Day

One-day workshops are perfect for diving into a new skill or jumpstarting a creative process.  Bring a friend, make a new one. And for our first-time students, apply discount code FA16W for a $5 discount when you register!

March 5: Moon Tools: Primal Creative Process

Are you passionate about a project, an art vision or a new habit? Do you find you don’t quite have the motivation or stamina to get it going, or you are halfway through and lose steam? Maybe you’re almost done but can’t seem to do those last few steps to complete it. This workshop is for anyone at any of these stages.

Register for Moon Tools workshop here.

 

 

March 12: Natural Dyeing

Save your avocado pits and weeds from the garden! Learn to produce paints, dyes, prints and more from plant materials.

Register for Natural Dyeing here.

 

 

 

March 26: Cigar Box Diorama

You don’t have to be a child to love to make dioramas. It’s one of those classic projects, where one can capture a perfect moment in time all in miniature.

Register for Cigar Box Diorama here.

The Art of Living Black: An Interview with Lorraine Bonner

Lorraine Bonner was born and raised on the East Coast. She moved to California in 1970, and began working in clay in the early 90’s. Her work began in response to trauma, but soon evolved to embrace the larger political and spiritual themes of dominationism and the mutually reflective processes of the political and personal. She lives in Oakland and is a mother and a grandmother.

What do you find most inspiring about making art? Tell us about your current projects.

The most inspiring thing I find about art is how much I learn from the clay. It’s as if whatever experience or question has started the imaging and creating process, the clay has a way of illuminating (at least for me) a continuous unfolding of understanding, from the cellular to the cosmic, but most importantly, from the personal to the political.

I have been working for some time on a series entitled, “Multi-hued Humanity and the Redemption of Black,” in which I use clay of many colors to represent humanity and our many colors. I want anyone who looks at these works to be able to find their own skin color somewhere in the sculpture, and to enable us all to recognize the way that limiting our definition of ourselves to the two boxes “black” and “white” makes our thinking small.

Hunger

At the same time, it is important to remember that the archetypes “Black” and “White” are equally powerful and essential to a full spiritual existence. Heartless, anti-human  political and economic power, defining itself as “White” has subordinated “Black,” and my current work is an attempt to bring this imbalance into view and create an opening in which black and white have larger meanings.

How did you become involved with The Art of Living Black? How does your work represent and uphold the tradition of this exhibition?

I became involved in The Art of Living Black many years ago, when I still had trouble thinking of myself as an artist. The support and encouragement, the feeling of family, the inspiration of other artists, all enabled me to develop greater confidence in myself and my art. I hope I am able to pass some of that inspiration and encouragement on to other artists.

What was your path to becoming an artist? Please share some of your favorite work.

I was dealing with personal trauma, therapy wasn’t working, and a friend gave me a bag of clay. My favorite work is a series called “Exploring the Perpetrator” in which I look at the impact of betrayal of trust, which is how I define “perpetration.”

Studying the Perpetrator

Who are your inspirations?

My main inspirations are the people who were the Civil Rights Movement. When I feel afraid, I think of them.

What do you like to do when you’re not making art?

When I’m not doing art I like to garden, read, or hang out with my kids and grandkids.

What’s on your bucket list?

I don’t really think I have a bucket list, at least at the moment, other than doing more art and writing.

If you could meet one artist, living or not, who would it be and why?

James Baldwin. His mind and courage and skill with language blow me away.

Thank you, Lorraine.

You can see more of Lorraine’s work on her website: http://lorrainebonner.com/

Lorraine’s Open Studio takes place this coming weekend, March 4-5, from 11am – 5pm @ 6725 Mokelumne Avenue in Oakland. Her work is currently showing at E14 Gallery, located at 472 9th Street in Oakland.

The Boundaries of Sculpture and the Alternate Meanings of Maps at the Richmond Art Center

The Boundaries of Sculpture and the Alternate Meanings of Maps at the Richmond Art Center
Two new exhibitions, Marking Space and Mapping the Uncharted, bring new meaning to the traditional arts of sculpture and mapping this Spring.

RICHMOND, CA — February 22, 2017 — In the new Spring sculpture exhibition Marking Space, opening on March 21, seven artists examine the nature of material and expose structure in a myriad of forms. Bay Area artists Mari Andrews, Robert Brady, Genevieve Hastings, Jann Nunn, Gay Outlaw, Lucy Puls, and Tracey Snelling use diverse materials to mirror habitat and architecture, to reflect on social structures, and to represent various human concerns.

In Marking Space, the very boundaries of what sculpture has become are redefined. Turning our attention to identity, the environment, systems of power, and inequality, these artists have followed different paths with a common passion of expression. These works investigate language, the body, and the nature of image, recognition, space and orientation. Throughout these artworks, a narrative emerges: self, home, loss, boundaries.

The companion exhibition, Mapping the Uncharted, uses physical maps as a point of departure for reconfiguring impressions of geography, politics, and visual language. Historically, maps have been drawn to mark where we are, what lies around us, what lies before us, and to note the paths taken so that others may follow or we may return.

The five artists in Mapping the Uncharted give new meaning to the art of map making. Mark Garrett cuts and paints and transforms maps into visualizations of patterns that emphasize the fragility and debasement of the ecology. Lordy Rodriguez expands and conflates maps to make visible our cultural and political conceits. Diane Rosenblum appropriates artworks and superimposes auction prices creating a map of the art world. Guillermo Galindo creates scores of music composed with instruments made of found objects, these collected along the US – Mexico border in collaboration with photographer, Richard Misrach. Indira Martina Morre creates delicate surfaces marking the most ethereal — cyberspace – passwords and passages are noted with symbols and layers noting information.

The exhibitions Marking Space and Mapping the Uncharted open in the Main, West and South Galleries on March 21 and run through May, 20, 2017, at the Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA. The opening reception for both shows will take place on Saturday, March 18 from 5 – 7 pm.

Two Artists’ Panels will be presented in conjunction with these exhibitions: April 1 and April 8, both starting at 2 pm. All events and exhibitions are free and open to the public. For more information about Spring exhibitions, programming, and events, please visit the Richmond Art Center’s website: http://richmondartcenter.org

Images:

Robert Brady, Return
Diane Rosenblum, Yayoi Kusama Painting 1989 – 2005

About the Richmond Art Center:

The Richmond Art Center is the largest visual arts center in the East Bay, delivering exciting arts experiences to young and old alike who reflect the diverse richness of our community. The Art Center features hands-on learning, well-equipped studios, Art in the Community programs and contemporary exhibitions in its galleries.

Every year, the Richmond Art Center serves thousands of students through classes and programs taught by professional artists, both onsite at the Art Center and at sites throughout Richmond. The Art Center’s four galleries mount rotating exhibitions that display the works of emerging and established Bay Area artists. Artists such as Richard Diebenkorn, Richard Misrach, Wanxin Zhang, Mildred Howard, Bella Feldman, Hung Liu, William Wiley, June Schwartz, and David Park have been showcased here.

The Richmond Art Center originated in 1936, when local artist Hazel Salmi, who worked for the WPA, traversed the streets of Richmond with a suitcase packed with art supplies, eager to teach art to anyone interested. Today, everything at the Art Center continues to breathe life into Salmi’s original vision: That within every person lives an artist.

Visit the Richmond Art Center’s website for more information: http://richmondartcenter.org/

Contact:

Julie Sparenberg
Communications Manager
julie@nullrichmondartcenter.org
510-620-6772

Create your new registration account in time for Spring Classes.

Create your new registration account in time for Spring Classes.

We’ve recently upgraded our class registration program to better help our students register for classes and workshops, sign up for memberships, and donate to the Richmond Art Center. Class registration starts on Tuesday, February 21.

To create your account:

1. If you have a current account with us, you will need to set up a new account in our ProClass system. But don’t worry… it’s easy!

And if you need help, we’re happy to walk you through the process. Just call our front desk at 510.620.6772, Tue. – Sat, 10 am – 5 pm and someone can guide you. If after hours, leave a message and we will call you back within 24 hours.

Click on this link: 
https://reg126.imperisoft.com/RichmondArtCenter/Account/Registration.aspx

This link will take you the login page for our new ProClass registration system. Enter your Username in the Returning User window on the right.
Then click on the “Forgot your password?” link above the red Login button.

2. You should now see the “Forgot Password” screen, which will ask you for your email. Please enter the email address associated with your account and hit Submit.

3. You will receive an email from the Richmond Art Center giving you your randomly generated user name and password. 
Use this information to log in. You will be able to change both of these once you are logged in.

4. Once you are logged in, you will be on the main page for your account. 
From here, you can change your user name or password, update your contact info, save a credit card on file, add someone to your account, purchase a membership, donate or register for a class!

5. To change your user name or update your account info, go to “My Account”.

6. Just type in the username you’d like to have, and hit Save!

7. To change your password, go to “Change Password”.

8. Once you’ve logged in and updated your username and/or password to your preference, you are all set! You are now ready to use the new system at your convenience.

Our staff is here to help you with any of this tutorial should you have questions. Please call us at 510.620.6772 if you need help.

The Art of Living Black: An Interview with KaliMa AmiLak

KaliMa AmiLak is an Oakland-based Photographer, aspiring Performing Artist and Model. A native from Brooklyn, New York, KaliMa has transplanted to California to expand the discovery of herself and her artistry. She currently runs a Photography studio at American Steel Studios with a focus on portraiture, fashion, commercial and editorial work.

What do you find most inspiring about making art? Tell us about your current projects.

What I find most inspiring about making art is the creation of it all. The process alone is invigorating because the possibilities are endless. It’s like fire — once the spark has happened the fire goes wild. Your ideas grow because of your excitement. A current project I’m working on now is an event called #PHOTOBOMB, a networking event for photographers and  models exchanging experiences, information, and taking photos revolving around a theme. I’m also in the process of revamping my current baby, Evoke the Goddess, which is a photography series and platform for womyn to celebrate their self expression and a means of visibility, empowerment, spiritual and cultural movement.

How did you become involved with The Art of Living Black? How does your work represent and uphold the tradition of this exhibition?

I became involved with The Art of Living Black with the inspiration of Nye Lyn Tho’s first time appearance last year and with the help of Stephen Bruce, who is

Motherly Prayer

also a part of the exhibition and someone who I consider a mentor as well. I believe that my work represents and upholds the tradition of this exhibition through documenting the experience of being Black, and ways in which we can show how to maintain our pride and self love even though we struggle with it all the time. As a Black womyn who mostly photographs Black womyn, I think it’s important, especially at this time right now to deliver a message to womyn that there is light in who you are, to be empowered and that the power you hold is beyond measurable. I speak to myself about this as well.  

What was your path to becoming an artist? Please share some of your favorite work.

It first started when I was in Brooklyn College and I wanted to take summer classes to make my graduation time quicker and I thought, ‘why not photography?’ So I took film photography summer courses, and that was it. I fell in DEEP love with photography. I once said to myself, “this looks like it was taken in a magazine!” That drove me to do more photos, and to make my ideas come to life. I took digital photography the next year after that in college, and that led me to get my first DSLR for christmas. I think my favorite work came from eight years ago when I made a series called, A Day In My Shoes, where I took random grungy shots in Brooklyn with my Converses, and my recent project in which I’m going to revamp called, Evoke The Goddess, where I have taken photos of Black womyn dressed in African/Cultural cloth and other props of their desire and I capture them in their Godliness.

Oshun

Who are your inspirations?

Great question. Black womyn inspire me because their strength is remarkable. The ways where they make their pain into something beautiful is inspiring alone, even if it isn’t art and it’s just living your life. It’s their growth overall. My parents because they’ve worked HARD to get where my family are now. Migrating to another country to make ends meet for your family at a young age is no easy task. But they did it, and all I wanna do is repay them for everything. Anyone who strives to work hard to do what it is that they love, putting their utmost time, energy and passion in their creation or career, is an inspiration to me.

What do you like to do when you’re not making art?

I’m very much of a chill person, so you would probably catch me watching a movie or on my laptop blasting music, lagging around like a cat in the house, reading, or spending the day outside. But I like making art so I might paint too.

What’s on your bucket list?

An Ode to Kali

Oh my. I’ve honestly just started my bucket list! A few things on my bucket list is to meet YeYe Luisa Teish, or at least spend like a week with her, to travel back to Africa, Louisiana, Peru, Japan, Hawaii (the list goes on!), to have some land in my country [Dominica], to buy my first home, to have a solo exhibition tour and to honestly just live my life the way I see fit, whatever that may be — fearing less and trusting more.

If you could meet one artist, living or not, who would it be and why?

Michael Jackson. Hands down. This is the man whom I have revolved my life around ever since I can walk and talk [my family would tell you lol!]. Despite everything, he was genuinely beautiful. He is one of the epitomes of a legend who is still unstoppable, and divinely creative.

Thank you, KaliMa.

For links and more info on KaliMa’s work and TAOLB shows:

Instagram: @laydeekayephoto

TAOLB VANGUARD
Oasis Gallery
American Steel Studios
1960 Mandela Parkway
Oakland, CA

Saturday Feb, 18th 3pm – 6pm
Sunday Feb, 19th 1pm – 4pm
Monday by appointment only

Featured Artists : KalLma AmiLak, Zoe Boston, Nye Lyn Tho, Winter Williams

Oasis Gallery
American Steel Studios
1960 Mandela Parkway
Oakland, CA

Satellite Art Tour
Feb. 25th & 26th 11am – 5pm
Mar. 1st Artist / VIP reception 6pm – 8:30pm
Mar. 3rd Art Murmur First Friday 6pm – 9pm
Mar. 4th & 5th Studio Tour 11am – 5pm

Visit and Contact

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Avenue
Richmond, California 94804
510.620.6772

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Hours
Tue – Sat, 10 am – 5 pm
Closed Sundays and Mondays & Major Holidays.

Gallery admission is free.