Richmond Art Center Richmond Art Center

Gathering in the Spirit of Gwarth-ee-lass
10/10/21

SPECIAL EVENT FOR INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY

Gathering in the Spirit of Gwarth-ee-lass

Sunday, October 10, 2pm-6pm

FREE | RSVP REQUIRED

Richmond Art Center (courtyard)

2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond

We gather around Leonard Peltier’s statue and legacy to celebrate the word – bearer of memory and dream.

PROGRAM*

  • Guided tour of the exhibition Time and Again @ 2:00 PM
  • Opening @ 2:30 PM
  • Anne Begay in conversation with Rigo 23 @ 3:00 PM
  • Poetry / Spoken Word @ 4:15 PM
  • Music by DJ Petrelli

Folks are invited to come for all or part of the program. Please note, space on the exhibition tour is limited.

SPECIAL GUESTS

Anne Begay, Diné, Co-founder of AIM-Denver Chapter in 1970; Rigo 23, Artist

POETRY / SPOKEN WORD

Tongo Eisen-Martin, San Francisco Poet Laureate; Doggtown Dro, Rapper, poet and artist; Meres-sia Gabriel, Richmond based writer, Panther Cub; Arnoldo García, Chiapas Support Committee; CieraJevae, Richmond Poet Laureate; Sheila McKinney, Richmond Youth Poet Laureate; Flavia Elisa Mora, Poet and Migrant Artivist; Kathy Peltier, Leonard Peltier’s daughter; Brian Tripp, Karuk, visionary artist, poet and esteemed elder

Please RSVP HERE if you would like to attend Gathering in the Spirit of Gwarth-ee-lass.


Like most Indian people, I have several names. In Indian Way, names come to you in the course of your life, not just when you’re born. Some come during childhood ceremonies; others are given on special occasions throughout your life. Each name gives you a new sense of yourself and your own possibilities. And each name gives you something to live up to. It points out the direction you’re supposed to take in this life. One of my names is Tate Wikuwa, which means “Wind Chases the Sun in the Dakota language. That name was my great-grandfather’s. Another name, bestowed on me by my Native Canadian brethren, is Gwarth-ee-lass, meaning “He Leads the People.”

Leonard Peltier, Prison Writings: My Life Is My Sun Dance, 1999

BIOS

Anne Begay, Diné

Born in New México and raised traditionally by her grandparents, Anne was sent to boarding schools in Oklahoma and New México. She survived that experience and later attended Haskell Indian Nations University and the University of Nebraska where she joined the Student Senate and majored in History. While there she also studied English and stage acting. 

She enlisted in the US Army and joined AIM – American Indian Movement – co-founding the Denver Chapter in 1970. She worked at the Denver AIM office while still in the Army.At the time of her discharge, Wounded Knee Occupation, 1973, was taking place, Anne helped with that effort. She gave birth to her single daughter, Kathy Peltier 1975.  She and her daughter Kathy, joined the Longest Walk in 1978. Anne raised Kathy on her own, remaining close to her and the Movement to this day – mainly as a “keyboard warrior.”

Together with Kathy she makes regalia and traditional beaded jewelry that they bring to rallies, speaking events, dances and pow-wows. This supplements Kathy’s travel expenses to see her father who is presently at Coleman Prison in Florida. They have been collaborating with Rigo in the Leonard Peltier Statue Project since 2018.

Doggtown Dro

Rapper, poet, artist. Pan African, Abolitionist and Revolutionary.

Tongo Eisen-Martin

Tongo Eisen-Martin is the current poet laureate of San Francisco. He is the author of Heaven Is All Goodbyes, published as part of City Lights’ Pocket Poet series, and someone’s dead alreadyHeaven Is All Goodbyes was shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize, received the California Book Award for Poetry, an American Book Award, and a PEN Oakland Book Award. Eisen-Martin is also an educator and organizer whose work centers on issues of mass incarceration, extrajudicial killings of Black people, and human rights. He has taught at detention centers around the country and at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, and is the founder of Black Freighter Press. His second book in the City Lights Pocket Poet series, Blood on the Fog, will be released in the fall of 2021.

Arnoldo García

Known as a colibrí, Arnoldo García is a community-based poet, musician and organizer. He is the co-author of XicKorea: poems, words, rants together with Beth Ching and Miriam Ching Louie and editor of Poets against War & Racism | Poetas contra la guerra y el racismo, a chapbook anthology of multinational and multiracial poets. Arnoldo is a member of the Chiapas Support Committee, which supports the Zapatistas and Indigenous land justice movements. Arnoldo is a restorative justice practitioner training youth, adults and new and experienced community activists and organizers to create deliberate relationships across communities rooted in self-determination and deep justice. You can read his work at artofthecommune.wordpress.com.

CieraJevae

CieraJevae is a Richmond Native serving her community as an artist educator, a healer, Poet Laureate, writer, activist, and scholar. She reps her ancestors, & shines light on the lived experiences of the divinity in Black women & girls through poetry and performance. She is the published author of her new collection of poems, Unto Ivy’s Rib, as well as the author of two chapbooks, Testimonies of Richmond, and Incarcerated Words. She obtained her B.A in Sociology, and her MFA in Writing. She currently serves as the Media, Arts, and Culture Manager at the RYSE Center.com For more, go to her website at cierajevae.com.

Sheila McKinney

Sheila McKinney (she/her) is a 16 year old poet attending Pinole Valley High School.  She serves on the Debate team, the African American Student Union, as well as WISE (Women in STEM Education). She is the first Youth Poet Laureate of Richmond, CA. She started writing and performing in 2020-2021, and already has co-facilitated a series of poetry workshops locally and nationally. Sheila uses poetry as a form of activism and as a tool for moving the world into a more just and loving place. Working with youth and learning from her peers has been one of the highlights of her experience as Richmond’s Youth Poet Laureate and a RYSE member.

Flavia Elisa Mora

Flavia Elisa Mora is a queer, Mexican migrant artivist, raised in La Mission, San Francisco. Amongst her interdisciplinary art practice, her main two focuses are muralismo and poesía. 

Flavia is a published writer, she has performed poetry throughout the Bay Area, and is one of the lead artists for the mural, “Alto al Fuego en la Misión” located on 24th and Capp. Her passions for both muralismo and spoken word poetry collide through her understanding that both forms are vessels for preserving history, intergenerational healing tools, and expressions of the soul.

Flavia’s prioritization of her own healing ties with her belief that revolution starts from the heart. She hopes that through her art, she can help create space for inspiration and positive change in her community.

Kathy Peltier, Dine’h/Navajo

Ya’ at’e’e’h, hello my name is Kathy Peltier. My parents are Anne Begay and Leonard Peltier. I’m an enrolled member of the Dine’h/Navajo Nation. I’m also Lakota and Turtle Mountain Ojibwe. I currently reside in Southern California. 

Kathy Peltier is a dancer, beadwork artist and world traveler. She started dancing when she was two years old, and has attended powwows all over the US as a traditional dancer. Kathy’s travels also include touring with Red Sun Rising to Australia as part of a dance troupe. To book Kathy for travel you can contact her via her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/kathy.peltier.12 or on Instagram @wazi_kat.

DJ Petrelli

DJ Petrelli is a revolutionary artist living in San Francisco.

Rigo 23

Rigo 23 has exhibited his work internationally for over 30 years placing murals, paintings, sculptures, and tile work in public situations where viewers are encouraged to examine their relationship to their community, their role as unwitting advocates of public policy, and their place on a planet occupied by many other living things.

Rigo’s projects have included inter-communal collaborations with Native Tribes in North and South America; long-term partnerships with political prisoners; and alliances with underrepresented and disenfranchised individuals and communities. @rigo23studio @peltierstatue

Visit and Contact

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Avenue
Richmond, CA 94804