Richmond Art Center Richmond Art Center

Requiem: The Remains of the Day, August 4, 2021

Requiem: The Remains of the Day, August 4, 2021

Exhibition: April 5 – June 3, 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday April 15, 12pm-2pm

Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

In this exhibition, photographer Ruth Morgan presents a selection of evocative photographs that document the devastation of Greenville, CA after it was burnt down by the Dixie Wildfire in 2021. This selection of photographs open up a conversation about the consequential effects and impacts of man-made climate change in our local communities. 

On August 4, 2021 at approximately 7:30 PM the Dixie Fire had already ravaged the ancient Sierra forest landscape and would soon crest the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range and roar through the small town of Greenville, CA. In less than 45 minutes it destroyed wooden buildings that had stood for over a century. A gas station, church, hotel, a museum and bar were among the structures gutted, along with nearly 100 family homes, schools and commercial businesses. The homes and property of approximately 1000 residents were reduced to rubble, fortunately all the residents were evacuated. 

Officially caused by a Pacific Gas and Electric Co. equipment failure, the fire was fueled and exacerbated by man-made climate change along with overgrown forests caused by decades of fire suppression and population growth at the edges of forests that would intensify the flames to cause the near obliteration of the town.

The exhibition and portfolios are a requiem to Greenville and a warning for us all to meet the challenge of climate change and ensuing global warming.

 

The Remembrance Project

The Remembrance Project

Exhibition: January 18 – March 18, 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 21, 2pm-4pm
Remembrance Project Workshop: Saturday, January 28, 2pm-4pm | More info…
Stitching Stolen Lives: Book Talk With Sara Trail: Saturday, March 4, 1pm-2:30pm | More info…

Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

Social Justice Sewing Academy presents The Remembrance Project, a cloth memorial of activist art banners commemorating the many people who have lost their lives to systems of inequity and racist structures. These banners have been created collectively by volunteers across the country to help educate and inform communities about the human impact of systemic violence.
 
The Remembrance Project banners are displayed by local and national organizations to express solidarity in the fight for social justice and remembrance of those lost to violence. The project remembers those lost to: authority violence (officer-involved shooting, police brutality, etc.), community violence (victims of gang violence, neighborhood or family, drive-by shooting, etc.), racial violence (hate crimes, racially motivated, etc.), and sexual and gender-based violence (violence against LGBTQ+, domestic violence, “missing, murdered Indigenous women,” etc.).

A collection of banners from The Remembrance Project are displayed at Richmond Art Center in remembrance of our community members who have been lost to violence.  

 

Connected Always

Connected Always

Exhibition: January 20 – March 11, 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 21, 2pm-4pm
Ancestor Wheel Workshop / Artist Talk: Saturday, February 18, 12pm-2pm

Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm
Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804

Connected Always is an exhibition by Santa Rosa-based artist Amanda Ayala, who presents a series of new works that explore the extensive generational connections we have with our ancestors. As part of her ongoing Ancestor Wheel project, Ayala’s work adopts circular patterns to visualize the magnitude of seven generations.  

Connected Always is a slow reflection on the process of knowing, appreciating and acting in full relation with our ancestors and their complete goodness.  

 

Amanda Ayala is an interdisciplinary Xicana Indigenous visual artist and maker who centers people targeted by oppression and acknowledges their brilliance. Amanda leads and facilitates workshops that combine artist liberation and social justice for people of all ages. She creates within community as a way to heal and transform society. @xicanaollin

I bring my Ancestor Wheel Project that explores inter-generational experiences and the importance of ancestral connection to heal from harm. I believe that our community can expand our understanding of our ancestral impacts and take on challenges that we face to understand the powerful impact we make now and on the generations to come. 

 

Image: Amanda Ayala, Ancestor Wheel, 2020

 

 

Art of the African Diaspora 2023

Art of the African Diaspora 2023

2023 PROGRAM

Exhibition at Richmond Art Center: January 18 – March 18, 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday, January 21, 2pm-4pm
Artistic Achievement Awardee Talk: Saturday, January 21, 12:30pm-1:30pm
Closing Party: Saturday, March 18, 2pm-4pm

Open Studios: Feb 25-26, Mar 4-5, Mar 11-12, 2023
Satellite Exhibitions: Throughout January, February, March and April

Richmond Art Center, 2540 Barrett Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804
Gallery Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 10am-4pm

Art of the African Diaspora is the longest running event of its kind in the Bay Area. The showcase exhibition at Richmond Art Center features work by over 120 artists of African descent. This exhibition is accompanied by open studios and satellite exhibitions throughout the Bay Area.

Every year an esteemed Bay Area arts professional selects three participating AOTAD artists to receive Artistic Achievement Awards. Awardees have their artwork featured in the following year’s exhibition. The featured awardee artists in 2023 are Derrick Bell, Cynthia Brannvall, and Pryce Jones.

Art of the African Diaspora originated from a salon for African American artists known as Colors of Black that was organized in 1989 by artist and professor Marie Johnson Calloway. In 1996 artists Jan Hart-Schuyers and Rae Louise Hayward established the exhibition The Art of Living Black at Richmond Art Center. Today the exhibition is called Art of the African Diaspora to incorporate a broader vision, and is run by a steering committee of participating artists.

Pick up a copy of the Art of the African Diaspora print catalog at Richmond Art Center for more info (available Jan 2023).

Learn more…

Top image: Cynthia Brannvall, Fulfillment, 2021, Photograph of the artists father, historical, contemporary, and satellite maps printed on rice paper and beeswax on wood panel, 20″ x 16″

 

 

 

 

Visit and Contact

Richmond Art Center
2540 Barrett Avenue
Richmond, CA 94804-1600

 

510-620-6772
Gallery Hours: Wed-Sat 10am-4pm